Special Town Hall Meeting

June 13, 2017 9-11 am

Orange Beach Community Center
Orange Beach, Al. 36561

What do we really know?

Knowing the letter of the law is not anyone’s favorite part of selling real estate, but it is arguably one of the most important parts of our job. Though we all work and act in ways that we believe to be appropriate and within the legal guidelines, too often agents are unknowingly breaking laws.

Creatures of habit

We are creatures of habit. We do things a certain way because that’s the way we have always done it. We may not even know why we do things a certain way but we certainly don’t want to change. To change would get us out of our comfort zone.

A Town Hall style meeting

Alabama Real Estate Institute is always trying to provide the best quality information available. We strive to stay abreast of the most current laws affecting the real estate industry and then we pass that knowledge on to our students. This is the reason we decided to have this “town hall” style meeting. Politicians use this type venue to get their message out and to gain support. So I decided to try it.

Attorney General speaks out

The main speaker for our meeting is Mr. Chris Booth. He is an Attorney General, appointed by the Governor of Alabama. He is also the senior counsel for the Alabama Real Estate Commission. I view him as the person that will prosecute us if we violate the state licensing law, and he is the one that will defend us when we’re in the right. Therefore, when he speaks, we should listen. During this meeting we will learn things that are not printed in articles.

Some of the topics discussed

Topics that will be covered in this town hall meeting are listed below; plus questions that you may want answers to.

  • Complaints received by the legal department of the real estate commission
  • What cost should be included in an estimated closing statement
  • Recovery fund verses E & O Insurance
  • Disclosure of caveat emptor and agency at initial contact
  • Power of Code of Ethics compared to the law
  • Property management issues and agent rentals
  • Disclosure of earnest money not collected
  • Real estate signs on non-listed property
  • RECAD and estimated closing statements as they relate to commercial property
  • Receipt of commissions bypassing the broker
  • Concessions and compensation as an inducement to purchase

It cost nothing for you to attend with the exception of your time. Breakfast type food will be provided at not cost to you. We do, however, ask that you RSVP me so I can save you a seat and make sure we have something for you to eat.

Please make sure you thank these sponsors for helping make this meeting possible.

Anchor Title and Excrow

Gold Star Realty

ACOPIA Home Loans

 

 

 

 

                       

 

 

Insulating Against A Law Suit

Generally most of my posts are adaptable to sales in any industry. Today I am specifically addressing real estate sales. If someone practices real estate very long, they will face legal issues; especially if they sell a lot of real estate. There is a very simple explanation for it too. It’s impossible to please everyone, and especially, if you represent both the buyer and the seller. In this type situation the buyer feels like the seller took advantage of them, while the seller feels like the buyer took advantage of them. As a Realtor® who is wedged between both parties thinking the agent showed partiality to the other party in the transaction. To complicate matters worse, in a typical real estate sales transaction there are numerous entities that have specific requirements and guidelines that must be followed.

Managing Your Risks

Generally most of my posts are adaptable to sales in any industry. Today I am specifically addressing real estate sales. If someone practices real estate very long, they will face legal issues; especially if they sell a lot of real estate. There is a very simple explanation for it too. It’s impossible to please everyone, and especially, if you represent both the buyer and the seller. In this type situation the buyer feels like the seller took advantage of them, while the seller feels like the buyer took advantage of them. As a Realtor® who is wedged between both parties thinking the agent showed partiality to the other party in the transaction. To complicate matters worse, in a typical real estate sales transaction there are numerous entities that have specific requirements and guidelines that must be followed.

In most real estate sale transactions there are two separate agencies involved. 

More times than not one agency will have the listing and represent the seller while the other agency will represent the buyer. [Read more…]

Understanding Caveat Emptor

 Alabama is Different than most other States…. I can’t say for sure but based on my research, the only states that are still caveat emptor states are Virginia, Arkansas, and Alabama. When a person buys real estate in these three states, they need to fully understand it is their responsibility to make sure they know what they’re getting, that it’s in good condition and works properly. When the buyer does his due diligence to have the property inspected, their legal rights remain in place after closing should some latent structural defect appear. If a buyer elects not to have the proper inspection done, closes on the transaction and then a latent structural defect appears and the buyer sues for damages; numerous Supreme Court cases have ruled in favor of the seller and stated caveat emptor; the buyer is responsibility to inspect the property prior to purchase.

BUYER BEWARE

This is a topic I try to talk about in every class I teach because it is the most important and the least understood law. I intentionally try to scare real estate agents to get them to understand the importance of the law and the effects it has on people buying real estate in Alabama. Today I will tell you how to see the law as it is written, disclose the other states that have the same law, and explain the dangers and remedies associated with caveat emptor.

Caveat Emptor is the law in Alabama…..

The Alabama Supreme Court has held caveat emptor to be the law in a consistent line of cases. Everyone should be on notice that there is no warranty which comes with the sale of a used home.

Real estate agents were taught when completing their educational requirements to get their license that caveat emptor is a Latin [Read more…]

Internet is Hurting the Buying Public

Our job is to protect the consumer!

Our job is to protect the consumer!

I’m sure a lot of people will disagree with my topic statement. Hopefully you’ll take time to read it and then I think you’ll agree with me; at least in part. According to the National Association of Realtors most recent studies, close to 95% of real estate buyers search the Internet to find property for sale. In some cases, by doing so, buyers are more familiar with what’s on the market then the agent at the time the buyer contacts the agent. In some cases the buyer tries to buy a property directly from the seller, rather than using the services of a real estate agent, and this is potentially harmful to the buyer. For anyone buying real estate in Alabama, Arkansas and Virginia, it is especially dangerous because of Caveat Emptor. State laws, in these states, place all the responsibility on a buyer could cost the buyer a lot, financially, after the sale has closed. Without talking with an agent in those states, the buyer would never know about the laws that could affect them and it could cause them to have no legal recourse should a serious issue arise. [Read more…]